A True Story?

Let me preface this blog post by saying that I have a tremendous fear of God and I don’t take matters to do with heaven and hell lightly. That said, I do believe there is a place for humour in life, even when it comes to spiritual matters. With this is mind, I’d like to present you with a story I came across recently. I hope it brings a smile to your face πŸ™‚


A gentleman, walking through a London cemetery, came across the following epitaph inscribed upon a tombstone. It read: β€œStranger pause as you pass by, as you are now so once was I. As I am now so will you be, prepare your way to follow me.”

Moved by the refrain, the man penned a response and attached his words to the tombstone. They read: β€œAs I am now so once were you, as you are now, so will I be too. But to follow you, I’m not content, until I know which way you went!”


And with that I will wish a belated Happy Thanksgiving to all my American friends, and to all my readers – enjoy the rest of the weekend!

Peace and blessings,

Steven x

9 comments

  1. Hi Steven, funny little story. I’m just wondering what your perspective on heaven and hell is, and what “fear of God” means to you.
    God bless, and well wishes for the upcoming Christmas season

    1. Hi David! I suppose for me fear of God means an awareness of His awesome power, and the fact that He can do whatever He pleases with that power. So I do believe that hell is a possibility, and having tasted a little suffering in my life I’m aware of what God could do to sentient beings in terms of making them suffer, if He so wished.

      I hope that answers your question! If you’d like me to elaborate on anything, let me know.

      Thanks for the festive wishes! I wish you a wonderful Christmas period too. Peace and blessings πŸ™πŸ»

      1. That’s a great definition for fear of God. It often seems to be quite a misleading term. That’s quite an interesting perspective on hell too, though I still find it quite hard to reconcile the idea of hell with an all loving God. I think it was St. Augustine who defined hell as an absense of God, which to me seems more in line with a loving God than the traditional notions of fire, pitchforks and eternal suffering.

        Thanks Steven

        1. I differ from a lot of Christians in believing God is in control of everything that happens. I believe God is behind everything that is commonly referred to as ‘evil’. It all comes back to the ontology of God, and having considered this deeply I came to the conclusion that God is omnipresent, and therefore there is no freedom from God (so it necessarily follows that God is in control of all things). So I wouldn’t necessarily agree with Augustine’s definition. I think that if hell exists it’s as much under God’s control as heaven. I don’t believe an absence of God is possible – to believe this you’d have to put boundaries on God, who I believe is boundless and infinite.

          Thanks for the opportunity to explain my perspective, David πŸ™‚

          1. Hi Steven

            My view is that consciously we may deny God’s omnipresence or pretend disbelief but He is ever-present in the unconscious part of all our minds. Hell is participation with God at a higher level without conscious belief in Him during our earthly existence. This is God’s fire and it will burn away our disbelief.

            Peace and love to all,

            Dinos

          2. I really find your perspective on Christianity fascinating. You’ve given me a lot to think about. As a panentheist too, the concept of hell and suffering are things I’m still trying to figure out in my own understanding.

            Thanks for the insight! Blessings

            1. Thanks, David. Really appreciate your kindness πŸ™‚ Check out my ‘Essays’ page sometime (if you get a chance, no presssure!) as I go into more depth on these subjects there πŸ™‚

              Blessings to you, brother! Steven πŸ™πŸ»

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s